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24 hour casino

The most casinos gambled in 24 hours is 74, and was achieved by Kimo Ah Yun and Gary Meyer (both USA) in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, on 19-20 October 2017.

Gary and Kimo decided to attempt this record again to better their previous attempt from 2015.

This time, they gambled at an additional 5 casinos within the 24 hour time frame.

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HARRISBURG — Cash-strapped and hard-pressed to fill a $1 billion budget hole, state legislators figured giving casinos the right to buy a $1 million license to sell liquor around the clock was one of those win-win scenarios politicians covet.

The state gets $12 million and casinos no longer have to cut gamblers off at 2 a.m. Well, yes, but not in the way legislators were hoping."We're not going to pay $1 million for the privilege of selling alcohol after 2 a.m. Pennsylvania’s new liquor law doesn’t take effect until August, and it may take longer than that for the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board to develop regulations and business processes to implement the complex legislation. Pennsylvania’s new liquor law doesn’t take effect until August, and it may take longer than that for the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board to develop regulations and business processes to implement the complex legislation.

And I don't know of any other casino that will," Sands Casino CEO Mark Juliano said. This one doesn't make a lot of sense."That means that the $149 million legislators hoped to generate from the new liquor law passed in June already has a $12 million hole and the law doesn't take effect until Aug. The law called for casinos to pay $1 million for a license to serve liquor on the gambling floor 24 hours a day, overriding state law that forbids serving liquor between 2 a.m. After the first year, casinos could then pay $1 million a year to renew the license for the next four years, before the renewal fee dropped to $250,000 a year.

Legislators assumed every casino would buy one, so voila, $12 million in the bank.

But since the expanded liquor sales provision was signed June 8, word that there will be no takers has trickled back to legislators, who are already planning to adjust the law when they return to session in September.

After years of frustration, there has been a lot of celebrating in Pennsylvania recently about improvements to the state's notorious Prohibition-era liquor laws. Tom Wolf boasted he had "freed the six-pack" by getting the Liquor Control Board to resume approving liquor licenses...